AZ Faces

Meet the interesting people in our communities!

Cowgirl Up! Art from the Other Half of the West

Fifty-eight of the most talented Western American women artists will be luring collectors and art lovers from around the globe out Wickenburg way for seven weeks this spring. The 13th Annual “Cowgirl Up! Art from the Other Half of the West” is on view at the Desert Caballeros Western Museum in Wickenburg through May 13, 2018. If you have never experienced this exhibit, you are missing one of Arizona’s art treasures.

The Colors of Tradition

Long before cowboys and pioneers, Native Americans were the epitome of the spirit of the West. They first learned to cultivate crops from the dry, brittle desert floor, and it was their ways that allowed pioneers, miners and cowboys to survive in the rugged Southwest.

Shaping the Desert Palette

Every artist undergoes a conjuring of sorts: a nearly magical moment in which ideas are created from a palette of experiences, interpretation and inspiration. The artist chooses a medium then expresses that idea in a combination of color, texture and scale. For the lucky few, others connect through their creations, forming a bond through shared thoughts and emotions, and enjoyment of the work.

Kyle Cass: Seeing Color Through New Eyes

The brilliant blue feathers of a macaw, the glistening red eye of a tree frog and the individually nuanced threads of fur on a cougar cub—they’re all part of Kyle Cass’s ever-expanding body of work. The collection is especially impressive considering that the artist is just 15 years old. Throw in the fact that Cass is colorblind and it’s practically astounding.

The Path: Miles Beneath My Feet

Anthem resident Lanny Nelson, known affectionately as “Lan the Running Man,” has logged about 75,000 miles in his running shoes. Recently, he embarked on a new, more challenging journey: surviving prostate cancer. Lanny has chosen to share his battle, and his hope, with our Images Arizona family.

Contemporary Cowboy: The Art of Michael Swearngin

In the early 1960s, on a 320-acre farm outside Knob Noster, Missouri, Anne Fay Swearngin cared for her grandson while doing the laundry. Without indoor plumbing, it was a time-intensive task and she feared that, unless the boy was thoroughly occupied, he might wander off and fall into the farm’s 160-foot-deep well. She handed him a bit of chalk and some crayons.

error: Content is protected !!